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geightor

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Reply with quote  #346 
Well since the Marlins have gone fishing I have to say GO DODGERS
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70sSkater

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Reply with quote  #347 
Hank, perhaps you should reconsider.  Brewers' skipper (and Milwaukee native), Craig Counsel, scored the winning run in the 1997 World Series for your Marlins.  (I happened to be in Florida during the NLCS that year and was lucky enough to get to see one of the games vs. the Braves).  What did any of those Dodgers do for you?  How about we not reward the richest teams who can afford to buy/rent players like Machado for a World Series run?

[Marlins_Braves_NLCS_1997]

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geightor

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Reply with quote  #348 
Nice hat I support dodgers because I followed them during the Koufax days they were my idols. I clipped the box scores and had all of their trading cards and knew everything about all of their players

Since then I have pulled for the locals until they load up the boat and go fish

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MikeInMD

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Reply with quote  #349 
Come on Chris.  Let's not be too harsh.  That payroll hasn't bought the Dodgers anything but the opportunity to play in the NLCS.  And re: Machado, if Corey Seager doesn't blow out his elbow and miss basically the entire season, they never make that trade. I've been a Dodgers' fan for just shy of 50 years.  It's been 30 years (1988) since their last title.  That's some long term suffering.  And I understand the wait for the Brewers.  But like I mentioned before, they really look like the team to beat this year.  Toss aside salaries and let's hope for a good series.  

All said, I despised the Yankees for decades in part because of them buying championships.  And their tendency to beat the Dodgers most of the times in head to head matchups in the Series.  Unless that happens for the Dodgers, by comparison, it's been a huge waste of money.  And I admittedly don't like it anymore with the Dodgers than I did with the Yankees doing it for decades.  Yes, they've had the highest payroll the last 5 or 6 years, but they've also had a large number of players nowhere to be seen on the active roster.  Last year the Astros proved salary doesn't mean much; playing for fun and as a team does.

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70sSkater

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Reply with quote  #350 
I'm not sure I see much of a distinction between the Yankees and the Dodgers, except that, perhaps, the Yankees have been buying talent longer than the Dodgers.  Last year, the Dodgers had the highest payroll at $242 million and the Brewers had the lowest at $63 million, outspending the Brewers by $179 million.  Despite having such a low payroll, the Brewers had a spectacular season but, nevertheless, fell just short of making the playoffs on the last day of the season.  My argument is that, when you're that close and fall short, it's because you didn't have the money to go out and get those key rental players to get you over the hump, not to mention attract and maintain big name free agent talent in the first place.

I'm not going to try to overanalyze this or really argue about it.  I will just say that, as a fan of a small market team for the last 48 years, I resent the big market teams that can buy all this talent, just like you resent the Yankees.  In any post season matchup of big market and small market teams, I will root for the small market team every time.  For that matter, besides loyal fans of favored teams, who doesn't like the underdog? 

You and Hank have long been Dodger fans.  I respect that.  My appeal is to those who have no loyalty to the Dodgers.  By the way, I rooted for the Dodgers in the 1988 Series, which was one of the more memorable World Series I've ever seen. 

For the record, if the odds makers are to be believed, it appears it is the Dodgers that is the team to beat.  That's ok by me.  I like the underdog anyway.  I will be at Miller Park on Friday and Saturday rooting for my Brewers.  May the best team win (which is the Brewers [smile]).

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geightor

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Reply with quote  #351 
I don't know which is worse between spending a lot of money to buy players or to have aa tremendous network of farm league teams that are producing unbelievable talent that is brought up to the majors and sold off. The Marlins have been doing this since their inception. Once they are about to get over the top, then they sell off the meat of team. This is in addition to selling off WSC teams a couple of times. Real disheartening for the local fans.   
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70sSkater

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Reply with quote  #352 
Quote:
Originally Posted by geightor
I don't know which is worse between spending a lot of money to buy players or to have aa tremendous network of farm league teams that are producing unbelievable talent that is brought up to the majors and sold off. The Marlins have been doing this since their inception. Once they are about to get over the top, then they sell off the meat of team. This is in addition to selling off WSC teams a couple of times. Real disheartening for the local fans.   



In the 1996 off-season period, and only four years after the Marlins' first expansion appearance in the Major League, Huizenga and General Manager Dave Dombrowski spent more than $89 million in transfers, the amount surprising the rest of the league.[28] The Marlins strengthened its pitching staff by luring Alex Fernandez to Miami and brought over third baseman Bobby Bonilla, outfielder Moisés Alou, reliever Dennis Cook and outfielders John Cangelosi and Jim Eisenreich.[29] In the 1997 season, the team made the playoffs for the first time in its history and went on to win the World Series, defeating the Cleveland Indians in seven games.[29]

In the next off season, Huizenga, claiming a financial loss of approx. $34 million running the team that year,[30] a claim subsequently disputed by Smith College economist Andrew Zimbalist in an essay,[31] ordered the $54 million players-payroll to be cut, which led to an exodus of most of the Marlin's championship players.[30] In November 1998, the year after it won the World Series, the Marlins were sold for a reported amount of approx. $150 million to commodities trader John Henry,[32] who would go on to sell the franchise in order to finance his 2002 acquisition of the Boston Red Sox. In 2017, the Marlins was sold by owner Jeffrey Loria to a group of investors for a reported sum of $1.2 billion.[33]

While his sale of the Marlins was characterized as "one of the worst moves in the franchise's history"[30] and Huizenga subsequently expressed regret over his final years with the club and wished he had instead chosen to "go one more year",[34] the analysts of the Baseball Prospectus, through statistical work, claimed that by both winning the sport's ultimate trophy and selling the club immediately after that win for a substantial profit, Wayne Huizenga proved to be a "genius."[29]

When he sold the Marlins, Huizenga, who still owned then-Pro Player Stadium, retained the rights to skybox tickets and club seat customers, as well as 62.5% of parking revenue, and 30% of concessions.[35] Economist Andrew Zimbalist commented that "Huizenga made a killing when he sold the team for $150 million [in 1998] and had the lease for this stadium that enabled him to keep just about all the stadium revenue."[35]


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Reply with quote  #353 
On this date in Milwaukee baseball history:

[Brewers_Oct_10]

I think Milwaukee is due for another World Series.

I was at that 1982 ALCS Game 5 when the Brewers won the pennant by defeating Reggie Jackson, Rod Carew and the California Angels 4-3.  I didn't have a seat, but did not mind standing for what was probably the most exciting baseball game I have ever seen.  The place went completely nuts when the Brewers won and fans rushed the field by the thousands.  It's games like that that make you really love baseball.  Like when Gibson hit the home run for the Dodgers in the 1988 World Series.


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Reply with quote  #354 
I heard Kershaw makes more than the entire Brewers' pitching staff combined.  Kershaw is the best.  The Brewers did get to him a little bit this season, but Kershaw was so dominant in his last start against the Braves.  Brewers will have their work cut out for them tomorrow.

I'm hoping tomorrow's outcome will be more like the Brewers' first outing against Kershaw and nothing like the second outing.  Yikes.


If the Milwaukee Brewers are going to take a 1-0 lead over the Los Angeles Dodgers in the National League Championship Series, the offense is going to have to be operating on all cylinders from the opening pitch.

That’s because one of the best pitchers in the major leagues for the better part of the last decade – left-hander Clayton Kershaw – will be taking the mound on six days of rest after the Dodgers steamrolled the Atlanta Braves in the NL Division Series.

The 30-year-old Kershaw arrives at Miller Park on the heels of tossing an absolute gem, an eight-inning, two-hit shutout in Game 2 in which he walked none and struck out three in a 3-0 victory over the Braves at Dodger Stadium.

A back injury and an arm injury combined to limit Kershaw to 26 starts in the regular season – his second-fewest since his rookie year in 2008 – but he was still solid with a 9-5 record, 2.73 earned run average, a WHIP of 1.04 and 155 strikeouts in 161 1/3 innings.

His 26 starts were second-most on the Dodgers behind lefty Alex Wood’s 33, but his inning and strikeout totals led the team. It could be argued that rookie right-hander Walker Buehler has been the team’s best pitcher over the last two months, but there’s no denying the presence that Kershaw brings.

“Look, it's a big challenge,” said Craig Counsell, whose Brewers beat Kershaw at Miller Park in his first game as manager in 2015.

"That, of course, is going to be a key. But at the same time, home runs do win these games. Home runs are still a big part of these games. You don't have to put big rallies together if you can get a walk and a two-run homer.

"It's tough to put together extended rallies against good pitching. The one mistake and popping one is more likely to happen in a lot of ways. But we've got to have good at-bats and break through somehow."

In 25 career appearances (20 starts), Kershaw is 8-7 with one save and 142 strikeouts in 130 innings. His eight-inning start against the Braves last week was his longest-ever in the playoffs and ranked as one of his best.

"His numbers speak for themselves," said Brewers outfielder Curtis Granderson, who faced Kershaw on a limited basis while spending most of his career in the American League, but then saw Kershaw on a daily basis when he was traded to the Dodgers late last season for a postseason run that came up just short in the World Series.

 "Watching him as a teammate, he's no different than playing against him -- he's a competitor, he goes after his guys and gives his team a really good opportunity to win.

"Everybody focuses on (the playoffs), but it's such a small sample size at the same time. If a guy pitches well or poorly in the playoffs, it shouldn't necessarily define his career."

Kershaw has started twice against the Brewers this season and experienced mixed results. He’s 1-1 with a 2.25 ERA and WHIP of 1.17, and struck out 12 in 12 innings.

On July 21 at Miller Park, he allowed one unearned run on three hits through the first five innings, with Ryan Braun reaching on catcher’s interference and scoring on a Keon Broxton groundout in the second.

The Brewers then got to Kershaw for three more runs in the sixth to take control of the game that Milwaukee went on to win, 4-2.

Christian Yelich led off the sixth with a booming home run to center field, Braun doubled and scored after Manny Piña reached on a Max Muncy error and then Piña scored on a Broxton triple.

Kershaw started against the Brewers again 12 days later and played a role in what was easily Milwaukee’s worst loss off the season – and one of the worst in franchise history. It also came on the heels of a walk-off loss the night before.

The 21-5 beating was a debacle almost from the outset, and easily the worst outing of the season for staff ace Jhoulys Chacín as he surrendered nine runs (eight earned), four walks and three homers in a 4 1/3-inning outing.

Cody Bellinger hit a grand slam in the third to break the game open and allow Dodgers manager Dave Roberts to lift Kershaw after six innings. He allowed five hits, two runs and two walks with seven strikeouts, with Yelich homering and doubling off him.

The game got so out of hand that Counsell had to pitch not one but two position players to close it out -- Hernán Pérez, who got rocked for six hits and five runs in a nine-run seventh for Los Angeles, and Erik Kratz, who threw a spotless eighth.

The Dodgers hit a total of seven homers in the game. The 21 runs were the most ever scored at Dodger Stadium and the most ever allowed by the Brewers. The 16-run losing margin was the second-biggest in franchise history.

"You just flush it out," said second baseman Jonathan Schoop, who'd just joined the Brewers earlier in the series after being acquired via a deadline-day trade from the Baltimore Orioles.

"A short memory is better. Even when you win, you flush it out and come back tomorrow. Those games that we played two months ago, you don't really pay attention to them. You pay attention to the present, prepare good.

"We know they're good, they know we're good. We're going to have a good series."

In addition to a solid rotation anchored by Kershaw and Buehler (8-5, 2.62), Los Angeles features a strong bullpen led by closer Kenley Jansen (38 saves) and a power-laden offense that slugged the second-most homers in the major leagues (235).

Seven players hit at least 21, with Muncy leading the way with 35. Manny Machado, who joined the Dodgers at the outset of their three-game series at Miller Park on July 20, hit .273 with 13 homers and 42 runs batted in over 66 regular-season games.

Machado is hitting just .176 so far in the postseason but leads the Dodgers with two homers and six RBI.

"It's different because it's a playoff series and obviously everything is going to be managed differently," Counsell said when asked how different the two teams are now -- if at all -- just over two months later.

"It's a good team and there were some good games in the seven games that we played. We know what to expect. We played both series in the second half so it's not that long ago. Similar personnel on both sides, really."

 

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70sSkater

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Reply with quote  #355 
Brewers' game day propaganda.


Few picked the Brewers to oust the two-time defending NL Central Champion Cubs for the division crown before the season. Even fewer picked the Crew to finish at the top of the NL. Yet, 166 games and three champagne celebrations later, the Brewers are division champions, the top seed in the NL, and four wins away from reaching the World Series.

So, does being widely regarded as the underdog again before starting the NLCS against a star-studded Dodgers team bother the Brewers?

"I like that position on our end," outfielder Ryan Braun said. "We've been in that position all year ... [In Spring Training,] nobody thought we'd have a chance to do much damage in the postseason and we just swept [the Rockies] in the first round ... We all feel confident about the way we're playing right now."

Now one of just four teams remaining, the Brewers have proven they can hang with anyone. They're arguably the hottest team on the planet right now, having won 23 of their 30 games since Sept. 1 -- including their last 11. Their recent tear stems from a versatile, productive lineup and a deep pitching staff that stifled the Rockies to the tune of just two runs in three NLDS games. Yet, despite all of the success on the field, the Brewers aren't changing their attitude as they get ready to face the Dodgers in the NLCS.

"We like that underdog mentality," third baseman Travis Shaw said. "We're used to it. We were underdogs all year and we won the most games in the National League. We'll take on that role again."

In other words, doubt this team at your own risk.

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geightor

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Reply with quote  #356 
70s you are obviously retired. I spent the last few days trying to read through your last two posts but I keep falling asleep.
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70sSkater

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Reply with quote  #357 
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Originally Posted by geightor
70s you are obviously retired. I spent the last few days trying to read through your last two posts but I keep falling asleep.


I should have had more pictures for you Hank.  How's this?

[Koufax]

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70sSkater

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Reply with quote  #358 
Or this?

[Hank-Aaron]

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70sSkater

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Reply with quote  #359 
Hank, you could be the Brewers' mascot.  (Or, just be in the doghouse).

Image result for hank the dog brewers

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geightor

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Reply with quote  #360 
Now that is sweet. I could send that puppy over to paly and let him barbeque him up so that we can have some baby back ribs for supper.  
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